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Scratch build Soviet Project 661 Anchar "Papa" Class SSGN K-222 1/120 Scale.

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  • #16
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    Here are the images. Hope they come out O.K.
    If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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    • #17
      See if these are larger images
      If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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      • #18
        Looks good, I was considering having a go at this myself, although was looking at 1/72. I got hold of some sewer pipe to use as the main hull and scared myself silly with how big it would be. Ever since I'm torn between just do it and be sensible. Did you notice that the fillet between the stern pontoons is actually a flap. A your scale it might not be practical to have it working.
        Next time someone points out it takes 42 muscles to frown, point out it will only take 4 muscles to b1tch slap them if they tell you how mnay muscles you need to smile:pop

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        • #19
          Thanks Albion,

          Yes I know that the internal section between the twin booms is movable. I intend on making it movable as there should be the room for the control surface connections. It will be a
          tiny surface. Thanks Trout for the added photos. I actually have all of these, I'm now trying to hunt down obscure photos that are hard to get. Once more I tend to pick obscure boats to model even though there is plenty of photo's of Project 955 Borei. Mike was a challenge. Papa was around for over 40 years. Although not operational for all of this time you would think once again there would be more photos of this Boat. There are hardly any! Why?

          Anyway, back to the development of the hull masters..

          Last time I was working on the fillet top and bottom that joins the twin booms and creates a web type structure that gives a square edge between the two booms and allows the fitting of the internal flap. This will be tiny but should easily have the room for the connections to be joined to the outer stern hydroplane. I haven't started work on this yet. It will be designed on Blender and 3D printed later. For now I have spent time using filler to fillet out the profiles of the booms. I have then run a ruler over the stern area on the lookout for undulations. Where possible I would then fill these areas with filler and use a straight plastic edge to try and create a smooth fill over the top to reduce the amount of sanding required later. At this stage the stern and bow section is still detachable as I haven't yet screwed and glued them in with the main PVC section.

          My time is currently divided between this and the rebuild of Resolution. Yep, folks, its officially the boat I cannot leave alone. I have decided to re-tool it because it's still not right. Have been on it's case for a couple of weeks now and armed with some new detail am going to redo the main hull halves.

          enough for now

          David H

          I
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          • #20
            Hello all,

            With the overall shape of the stern and bow sections generally met, I decided it would be time to look into securing the front and back of the boats to the three layers of pvc pipe that make up a rather unconventional diameter. At the last Gosford Sub regatta I got talking to one of the Queenslanders that makes it down every second year, Jim Russel. I asked him about gluing PVC and he said that nothing beat using Plumbers PVC glue. I wasn't too familiar with it so along to Bunning's (big hardware chain here in Oz) to have a look. There are several different categories of this glue it turns out. I decided on the one for pressure pipes as I do want to build a Ballast tank using the pressurised system that I am very familiar with.

            Anyway this pressure rated PVC glue is a green goo. Has enough warning labels on the side of the pot. I made final arrangements to check that the pipes were set up the way that I wanted them to be. The outer pipe having the split at the top, this would be filled with filler and would make up the flat strip that runs the length of the boat. I then rotated the middle pipe with the split halfway down one side. The innermost pipe had no split.

            Once I arranged these in the right order I had to think about how I would put the green goo inside. The pvc pipe is fairly rigid and doesn't like to be flexed too much. The green goo is not to be messed with and I had to think about how I was gong to pry apart each layer of pvc pipe in order to get a layer of goo in their without the PVC pipe snapping back on me, and possibly flicking some of the goo in my face. Glasses and gloves.

            I carefully set up the pipes in such a way that I could use the little brush that comes in the pot, on the underside of the lid and then brush a layer on to the outside of the innermost pipe. I then carefully sprung apart the second middle layer and snapped it over the inner tube gently sliding it so that it rotated to the right position. Once done I then repeated the process with the glue on the middle layer for the last. then once all three were done making sure that they lines up and at the ends were aligned also.

            Then it was simply a case of sliding the bow and stern over the ends. Once this was done I looked a putting some self tapping countersunks in the top recessed section where the first split is. drilling these into position and then smoothing over with filler that would become the main deck on the hull.

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            David H

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            • #21
              Hello All,


              So after assembling the bow and stern plugs in place, and using self tapping screws to secure them at either end, I then filled the gap section that occurs at the top of the hull and runs the length of the PVC section. As mentioned before this was intentional as the top of the Papa's hull has a subtle flat deck section. By laying down filler and then sanding it back level I would be able to very easily replicate this section. I did notice that the bow section at the top is slightly higher than the flat section at the top, so I will have to sand a flat section beyond the end of the forward PVC section in order to make it continuous.

              I haven't started sanding down the top of the middle section yet. Too busy with an order, also retooling Resolution and creating my first twin shaft WTC for this baby.

              However I have managed to get the 3D printer to work it's charms. Back in October I started the development of a Blender model of the Project 661. I focussed mainly on the development of the appendage parts, all the stern planes and bits and pieces. The aim once again like the Borei was to get the Printer to do some of the 'heavy lifting' in terms of getting parts made. Soon enough I had the machine set up and worked out the scale of the parts to print and then off it went.

              3D Printing is a bit of an art form. The positioning is crucial. The was the part sits on the base will Either make it easier or harder on the printer and add more time and material for the print. Overhangs really slow down the job as extra 'scaffolding' is needed under the part. Fins print best pointing up and not lying flat. Lying flat they tend to bow.
              The brilliant thing about 3D printing is that while you work on something, you've got a little helper making parts for you. Also you can guarantee identical multiple parts.

              David H


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              • #22
                3D printing is a bit of an art form. Really!

                David
                "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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