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Scratch build Soviet Project 661 Anchar "Papa" Class SSGN K-222 1/120 Scale.

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  • #91
    Hello All,

    After getting the top and bottom level and straight, I turned to dealing with the registration lip that would run around the inside of the lower hull and hold the top down. This is made from a strip of fibreglass that
    is glued along the inside of the lower hull with the upper edge of the strip protrude about 3-4 mm above the edge of the lower hull. Once glued down I ran a file along the rim of the lower hull to smooth down any blobs of resin that may stop the upper hull from completely closing.

    I once again used my customary bow assembly technique of gluing the lower hull at the bow to the top bow and using a small aluminium flat bar with a screw thread in it to secure the top and bottom hull sections and a lip in the rear of the upper hull to slide in under the back top hull section attached to the lower hull. This flat bar has to be glued onto the bottom bow section before the top and bottom can be glued together.
    The bar points stern ward and aligns up with a hole drilled in the bottom of the lower hull that comprises the rest of the hull. I marked out a line, that runs from one side to the other, this will be where the lower cut will be made. I then glue the plate across the line. The will be cut out from underneath. I wrap the end with the solitary hole in sticky tape in order to make sure that the fibreglass does not stick to this end. Then I drill extra holes in the other end to allow the resin to flow all through the holes securing further, the front end.

    Once this is done and glued securely , I then drilled the rearward hole with a smaller diameter hole that will act as a pilot later on for a larger one. Marking where the lower cut would line up with the top hull I then roughed up around the bow rim on top and bottom. I then secured down the top and bottom hull in just the right spot with tape and then glued the top and bottom section around the bow. I laid a thin strip of cloth and resin around the bow and let that set.




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    I would not glue the stern top section on till I get all the stern arrangements just right. This would involve aligning and setting the two stern shafts in place and making sure that the horizontal planes were installed aligned and with free movement. This would involve a fair bit of time and fine tuning to get right. I initially started with an aluminium bar that would be the support for both the shafts. I have made a thinner aluminium bracket that bolts down over the top with a single bolt in the middle. The shafts are dampened by having nitro silicon line sleeved over them to dampen vibration. More detail to follow next week.

    David h



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    • #92
      Hello all,

      I found a whole heap of photos showing the lip that I used for the stern of the hull and the front that I did'nt put up last week. Because the rear top of the hull is essentially a double curve I cut out a rounded strrip in two to effectively cover the curves. Roughing up the surface and then using some P'yester resin mixed with some chopped strand gives good adhesion.


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      • #93
        So...

        Now for all the mechanical stuff in the rear end. This boat is different in that I would be mechanising the middle flap in between the prop shaft booms. This is the only Russian Boat that I know of that has this arrangement, never repeated on Oscar or Delta. I do wish however that Papa had the twin vertical underside rudders that Oscar has, very cool. This area for this link up is really really tight. Its small and will need a very small pushrod arrangment. The one simple thing to produce will be the Vertical rudder shaft. I will not have to split it to get it around a prop.

        Initially I started off by setting up the prop shafts. I glassed down an aluminium bar that would be the overall resting place for the shafts. I have thought hard about some kind of damping for the shafts and played around with some different materials such as rubber bands, seen here. I realised that they would eventually perish, along with anything rubber. Oh well see how it goes in initial testing of the shafts.
        This area is so tight that once sealed up it is going to be seriously hard to access things, if a coupling or part goes pear shaped and doesnt work.


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        After cutting out the shafts for the Horizontal planes I needed to make a small bushing at either end to house the shafts and make sure that they aligned exactly relative to each other. These tiny bushings will simply be made out of fine brass rod and resined onto the edge of the rear hull where the shaft will penetrate. In order to do this i have to use a longer length of shaft ,coated with Lanolin to make sure that the are being resined ,which is tiny does'nt get into the bushings and glue shut the temporary aligning rod. That would not be good. I had to make a small semi circle where the bushing rests. I also had to grind out a square section for the block that sticks out of the stern plane moulding.



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        I spent a fair bit of time making sure that the top half of the stern also aligned up and that there was also a semi circle where the bushing would be pushing into the top half. I had to carefully measure the distance between the shaft and both stern booms to check for square. This took quite a while but is absolutely essential. Forward of the shaft is the aluminium plate that will be the mounting for the twin shafts that will be installed a little later.

        After this I carefully ground down the excess glass around the edges of the bushings to allow the top hull stern section to simply push down over the top and close flush. The two holes were where I didn't quite get the alignment right the first time for the vertical rudder shaft. Anyway after this I needed to start installing the shafts because I needed to check that there would be enough space in between the outer side of the boom and the prop shaft in order to get a swinging push rod horn in for the horizontal plane.

        I have the brass rods extrude about 5-6 mm from the bushing, thus giving just enough room for the brass plate to be soldered to the shaft allowing a push rod to be attached. As it is there is about 4-5 mm clearance between the side of the hull and then side of the shaft. Just enough to get a horn and clevice in place.



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        The prop shafts are held in place by a aluminium plate that is flexible and can be bent around the shape of the two shafts. I have also places a silicon nitro line "sleeve' over the shafts where they will clamp down over the aluminium bar that is glassed down. This arrangement will probably be changed as ultimately the alignment of the shafts to the outlets on the WTC are more important. These won't necessarily sit nice and neat on the aluminium as I have them here. I also intend on Gluing or glassing at the tapered rear end so that the shafts don't jump around which they'd likely do if not properly secured. I know this back end looks messy, however when the top is glued down, you ain't going to see it..


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        Until next time...































        Attached Files

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        • #94
          Hello all,

          As can be seen from the previous photos I also installed the shaft for the Rudders. A much simpler operation. However I was frustrated with the limited travel that I was getting out of the horizontal planes. As the two horizontal planes were attached to their own shaft running back and joining to a common pushrod, all I needed to do was move this common pushrod laterally (sideways) and then I would get diffing amoints of travel out of the planes. Move them far enough to one side and one would be travelling upwards and the other down. I was also getting more up movement than down. This was frustrating as I wanted consistency between both pairs. I decided to pull the individual brass pushrods off each horn and devised a new design that I have called for want of a better term a "swaybar". This is where just like the conventional way of joining the rudders around a centre shaft I have created a very long U bend. It is soldered to where the holes are located on the horns and then a single clevice is attached to a soldered horn around the middle of the swaybar. It comes close to touching the inner bottom of the hull but guarantees that the two horizontal planes move exactly with each other. I have also attached the fine brass pushrod from the tiny horn attached to the inner flap. This has since proven to be a very effective design and I get far more movement from all surfaces.

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          After getting all the installation right and working I then focused once more on the Vertical fins. The top of the stern hull would lower down over the vertical shaft and would have to align with the bottom hull in such as way that the rudder shaft was dead vertical longitudinally and laterally. I started by gluing the lower rudder onto the brass shaft and then making sure that It aligned with the lower rudder post. making sure that the rear edge aligned with the hole that extends up through the bottom of the hull then up through the top of the hull yet to be glued down. Once the top hull is aligned then the top rudder is slid down and glued onto the shaft and then the top rudder post is glued over the top Slotting the brass bend in the top of the rudder creating the top pivot mechanism. Once all this was done then the whole assembly was effectively glued down. The only way to majorly take it apart would be to break the join of the top rudder on the brass shaft. A large amount of surface area to do so with. I also added a small amount of bouyancy foam...


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          Before closing the top section down I thickened up some resin with weave and talc, then laid it down in the trough where the shafts set and the very stern section of boom. I rubbed lanolin on the shafts as I didn't want to embed them rigidly in the resin. I then closed over the top section. I checked all the connections before finally lowering the top and dealing with the top rudder. Then Glues around the equator where the two halves meet and then applied filler. I carefully smoothed over gentle radius on the fillets around the horizontal planes as the transition to roots on the hull.

          A round of gradually reducing wet and dry reveals and smooth set of curves and free moving horizontal and vertical surfaces.

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          Like all Soviet subs Papa had a while plethora of masts. I usually put about three on any given boat. I have already spent some time creating moulds for several of them to include in the kit. It was now time to turn to the fin. Firstly I drilled a 5 mm hole in the top of the hull inside the sail profile. This would be where a hold down bolt would attach the sail to the hull. I then cut out a small piece of fibre glass and drilled a corresponding hole in it. I then glued the bolt through this pointing downwards. The fibre glass piece being glassed in place down near the base of the fin, just slightly above. The bolt passes through to hull and is met with a nut that secures it.

          After this I drilled a series of fine holes in the top of the fin that sits on top of the two sides. Then getting a fine square file grinding out to a square or rectangular profile. This would be the positions of the masts. I then took the top of the sides and drilled drainage holes that would not align with the mast holes as I wanted to drill these separately as to ensure a snug fit for the mast as it slides down into both layers of glass. I then glued to top down onto the sides and fillerd around the edges to get the transition smooth. Re-scribed some detail including the faceted panels on the front of the fin similar to the array pattern found on the bow of the Foxtrot class. then prayed with a matt very very dark grey. After this, install the masts.


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          Getting there!

          Plenty more next week. Feel free to comment and give suggestions.

          David H

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          • #95
            Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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