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S 512 Evangelista Torricelli (ex USS Lizardfish), 1/72

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  • S 512 Evangelista Torricelli (ex USS Lizardfish), 1/72

    Hello lads,
    I've just received all the items from Bob s I can start a building thread.
    The plan is to build this yuge boat (to me anyway!) to represent S 512 Evangelista Torricelli, the former USS Lizardfish.
    I've diligently studied Gato Cabal reports and other conversions but still can't decide where to cut the demarcation line between lower and upper hull valves. I would rather open through a removable deck or something else such as removable stern and removable deck fwd portion.
    Since i want my models to incorporate every time something new, i'm thinking to build the sail out of 1mm plasticard for framing and beer can aluminium for skins. The hope is to replicate a subtle oil canning effect and a light sail.

  • #2
    I like the plastic framing and sheet-metal (beer-can) approach with the aim to 'oil-can' the thing between stringers and frames. Slit it at the waterline like God intended!

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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    • #3
      There are different camps on opening your boat (for the record, I can't find scripture supporting David's claim about God intended). My Gato did not cut along the waterline and David does. Who has more experience? (Duh - David)
      Would I do it the same next time? Possibly, but if you go through the deck like I did, it will be cramped and at times a pain to work on. However, I liked not having to slice through the hull.
      I really am looking forward to your build for several reasons, one I love the Gato and the wonderful histories that go with them. You also are doing something unique and I like that. I want to see how it turns out. Lastly, what a fun sub to run and it is great to think there is going to be another amount our ranks!
      Go get 'em!
      If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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      • #4
        I likewise did not do my Gato cut at the waterline. I opened it up under the deck superstructure. This method seemed to me to be easier and and looks much better. The downside is inserting the subdriver and making the prop wishbones connections a bit more fiddlier but so far so good!

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        • #5
          Ok guys, you convinced me. I was anyways leaning toward open under the deck solution. Cutting through the waterline seems to be a heck of a lot more work for little gain and, beside that, it sends me shivers down my spine.
          It can't come out more cramped than my 1/350 Akula stern... :)

          I must say that it's been many years since i follow HWSNBN's work but i'ts the first time that i can see in first person the sheer quality of it. It's simply astonishing and worth every penny!


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