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Russian K329s

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  • Russian K329s

    My expermental boat is now a Russian Severodvinsk K329s "Yasen" :wink:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR0AXplfvAw

    Cheers Chris.

  • #2
    This is your Alfa made from a modified Dumas Akula right?
    Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice! Can we see her upclose?
      IT TAKES GREAT INTELLIGENCE TO FAKE SUCH STUPIDITY!

      Comment


      • #4
        Here it is just after the first coat of black






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        • #5
          You need to cover those torpedo tube doors on the bow then rescribe new ones on the sides.
          Also the sail is located closer forward. Maybe you could cut out the sail and move it a bit forward then make a new rear deck out of styrene sheet. This way you could put a VLS on her.
          Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
            You need to cover those torpedo tube doors on the bow then rescribe new ones on the sides.
            Also the sail is located closer forward. Maybe you could cut out the sail and move it a bit forward then make a new rear deck out of styrene sheet. This way you could put a VLS on her.
            Stop nit-picking, damit .... AND FINISH YOUR 1/144 KILO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

            And Chris: you turned a dog into a good looking mutt there. Dynamic or static diver?

            David
            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Now running with my tail between my legs...
              Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks redboat219, but you are talking about a K329, what we have here is a K329s.:wink:

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's been a while since I have been here and a lot has changed.
                  My k329S went missing when on patrol. It was doing a demo run at a large lake in the mid north of South Australia during our winter. It was the commanders fault he (me) lost contact with it when he (I) looked away to answer a dumb question. First thing that was done when it was lost was to stop ALL actions, but after a couple of minutes (which seemed like hours) it was decided to blow the emergency ballast. Still no sign of it not even bubbles. So I sat there looking at the area where it should be for ages. Still no luck. A sweep of the area with a net also returned no result. After a hour had passed and all sorts of things tried I came the decision that it was lost. Being the type of guy that hates loosing things and the lake is only 3/4 of an hour away from home I would go there whenever I could to look and reflect on where it could be.
                  South Australia is a hot and dry place and with each visit I noted that the level of the lake was dropping as the seasons changed. Come on summer.
                  One of the visits I made in summer on my bike I thought I could see a dark shape about the correct size in about 3 foot of water and 15 foot from the now edge of the water, what could a bloke do?
                  A quick look around, no one in the area, Off with the boots, socks, and jeans and in I went. Mud ozzzing between my toes my shirt now wet I felt at it with my toes around the shape and picked up one end with my foot just enough to grab it with my now soaked arm. YES it was what I was looking for. MY MISSING SUB. Now how to get it back home on my Sportster? Lots of fun!!!!!.
                  The battery was flat(LOL), every thing that had steel in it was rusted on the out side but the dry areas were still dryish. no water but corrosion on everything and in the hull 2 living things. It had become the home for 2 Yabbies, small fresh water crays.



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                  • #10
                    Now, THAT'S weathering!

                    You got it back! I well know the awful feeling as you bring an empty boat-stand back to the shop. You did not give up on it. Good work, sir!

                    David
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In the end luck always comes to Harley riders! This is from a Harley rider! Just ask David who taught me everything I know about our hobby while visiting him twice on my Harley!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oztruck View Post
                        One of the visits I made in summer on my bike I thought I could see a dark shape about the correct size in about 3 foot of water and 15 foot from the now edge of the water, what could a bloke do?
                        Understanding these "fish" most certainly drift around the lake over time, was she any great distance from where you think you lost her? How about her heading? Going away, right angle, or coming back to that last spot?

                        FWIW, these were some of the first questions asked of me by everyone regarding the recovery of my sons 1/96 BLUEBACK last November at the SubBase in Groton Ct.

                        She was way to heavy at the stern (submerged trim) and actually settled almost directly beneath where my son dove her. That's what I get for assuming the submerged trim was "close" after the refit and not not check it before handing him the transmitter. So did she go down by the stern with little to no headway?

                        We, including a CPO Navy Diver, apparently looked everywhere but there. Thank goodness they drain that man-made lake yearly.

                        This begs the question, and I know every situation is different. But what is the correct procedure when a loss of visual occurs?
                        Blow Tank?
                        All-Stop?
                        Kill TX?
                        Is that the order?

                        After several minutes, would repowering the TX cycling the propulsion in amounts (2 sec fwd/3 sec Aft) hoping to dynamically drive her stern up to the surface help? It did with Ray's ALPHA.

                        Or just leave it alone and find a dive service?

                        Thoughts? Opinions? Egg Throwing??
                        NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by QuarterMaster View Post

                          Understanding these "fish" most certainly drift around the lake over time, was she any great distance from where you think you lost her? How about her heading? Going away, right angle, or coming back to that last spot?

                          FWIW, these were some of the first questions asked of me by everyone regarding the recovery of my sons 1/96 BLUEBACK last November at the SubBase in Groton Ct.

                          She was way to heavy at the stern (submerged trim) and actually settled almost directly beneath where my son dove her. That's what I get for assuming the submerged trim was "close" after the refit and not not check it before handing him the transmitter. So did she go down by the stern with little to no headway?

                          We, including a CPO Navy Diver, apparently looked everywhere but there. Thank goodness they drain that man-made lake yearly.

                          This begs the question, and I know every situation is different. But what is the correct procedure when a loss of visual occurs?
                          Blow Tank?
                          All-Stop?
                          Kill TX?
                          Is that the order?

                          After several minutes, would repowering the TX cycling the propulsion in amounts (2 sec fwd/3 sec Aft) hoping to dynamically drive her stern up to the surface help? It did with Ray's ALPHA.

                          Or just leave it alone and find a dive service?

                          Thoughts? Opinions? Egg Throwing??
                          Having been around this tree on several occasions -- and never losing a model for more than seven days -- here's what you do on the first indication of non-response of the submerged model submarine:

                          1. throttle to all-stop
                          2. turn off the transmitter (and keep it off till you or some other idiot has entered the water)
                          3. stand your ground, find a land-mark on the opposite shore in line with where you assume the model to be and mark the spot where you're standing (if there is another person who was watching when the boat went missing -- have him do the same, and to mark the spot where he's standing, triangulation is your friend here)

                          After all that, and the model has not responded to the fail-safe, assume the model is on the bottom not too far removed from your estimated point-of-loss.

                          4. with your assistant standing where you marked your position at time-of-loss, swim out in line between him and the landmark on the opposite shore -- if a second or third line has been established have those people sing out when your swim line intersects their line-of-site to their opposed shore land-mark; keep swimming till your assistant(s) sing out.
                          5. OK, you're over where the model is likely to be -- stick your fat head underwater and listen (a trusted buddy having been instructed to turn the transmitter on and to cycle the motor ahead-astern equal amounts in quick jabs of the stick
                          6. if you hear the model move a bit and repeat the listening trick -- as sound travels too fast in water for your tiny brain to read direction, you have to move around until the noise is the loudest
                          7. X marks the spot -- drop an anchored buoy marker so you don't cover old territory
                          8. take a deep breath and go looking (with your hands in most cases, dumb-ass) as your assistant keeps up with the forward-reverse noise making

                          No soap? Head back to shore, turn off the transmitter, break camp; and sneak back that night with SCUBA, a circle-line, well rehearsed story to tell the police, and a thermos of hot coffee.

                          Kevin Rimrodt and I are masters of late-night recovery of lost r/c submarines in waters where swimming is prohibited (Virginia Beach's Mount Trashmore Lake, for example). It might take several chilly, tiring evenings, but you'll get that sucker back. (and the cop's will have a good story to tell during night watches).

                          Rotsa Ruck!

                          David
                          Last edited by He Who Shall Not Be Named; 07-12-2017, 03:03 PM.
                          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It might be time to revisit the WSRR!

                            Rescue Buoy for Idiots.

                            Electrometronics and sparky things are not my forte but simple mechanics I'm OK with. I've been thinking about the rescue buoy thing for a while and looking for an absolutely fool proof way of releasing a rescue buoy. Turns out that there isn't one but this comes close. This is a test rig for a rescue buoy held in place with a water soluble rod. It takes around four hours for the rod to weaken to the point that it shears off and allows the retaining plunger to float free. The reel holds 15 metres of flat, waxed nylon with a test strength of over 30 Lbs. More than enough to safely pull your precious (and inert) submarine from the bottom of some muddy lake.



                            The frame and spool are made for a simple CAD drawing (because I couldn't find a ready made spool of the right size) and printed on a 3D printer. The float is plastic covered foam with a magnet to attach it to the retaining plunger.

                            The reel is mounted on a 2mm brass rod which can be extended to lock the retaining plunger in place to deactivate the system. Handy if you are running in a place where you know you can locate and recover a sunken boat easily.


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                            The key to this is the water soluble retaining rod (or WSRR). It is guaranteed to function each time, every time.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HardRock View Post
                              It might be time to revisit the WSRR!

                              Rescue Buoy for Idiots.

                              Electrometronics and sparky things are not my forte but simple mechanics I'm OK with. I've been thinking about the rescue buoy thing for a while and looking for an absolutely fool proof way of releasing a rescue buoy. Turns out that there isn't one but this comes close. This is a test rig for a rescue buoy held in place with a water soluble rod. It takes around four hours for the rod to weaken to the point that it shears off and allows the retaining plunger to float free. The reel holds 15 metres of flat, waxed nylon with a test strength of over 30 Lbs. More than enough to safely pull your precious (and inert) submarine from the bottom of some muddy lake.



                              The frame and spool are made for a simple CAD drawing (because I couldn't find a ready made spool of the right size) and printed on a 3D printer. The float is plastic covered foam with a magnet to attach it to the retaining plunger.

                              The reel is mounted on a 2mm brass rod which can be extended to lock the retaining plunger in place to deactivate the system. Handy if you are running in a place where you know you can locate and recover a sunken boat easily.


                              Click image for larger version Name:	P1000551.jpg Views:	1 Size:	92.7 KB ID:	91892



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                              The key to this is the water soluble retaining rod (or WSRR). It is guaranteed to function each time, every time.
                              Spaghetti... you clever SOB!

                              David
                              "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                              Comment

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