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Russian K329s

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  • #16
    Up here for dancin' , oh - wait a minute.....

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    • #17
      Originally posted by HardRock View Post
      This is a test rig for a rescue buoy held in place with a water soluble rod. It takes around four hours for the rod to weaken to the point that it shears off and allows the retaining plunger to float free.
      .
      I experimented with a similar system back in the '90's using a "Tic Tac", which unfortunately gave out in less that 30 minutes.

      4 Hours is perfect! I get bored running my boats after 3.

      I'm kicking myself because PASTA never occurred to me, and me having grown up on the stuff since my Mom is from Livorno Italy!!

      Way to go!!

      For those of us who do not 3D print.......

      Dave, when can we find these accessories from ND made available for different size boats? Maybe modified to use a discreet, floating "International Orange" rod coming out of the sail for smaller models?

      NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post

        Having been around this tree on several occasions -- and never losing a model for more than seven days -- here's what you do on the first indication of non-response of the submerged model submarine:

        1. throttle to all-stop
        2. turn off the transmitter (and keep it off till you or some other idiot has entered the water)
        3. stand your ground, find a land-mark on the opposite shore in line with where you assume the model to be and mark the spot where you're standing (if there is another person who was watching when the boat went missing -- have him do the same, and to mark the spot where he's standing, triangulation is your friend here)

        After all that, and the model has not responded to the fail-safe, assume the model is on the bottom not too far removed from your estimated point-of-loss.

        4. with your assistant standing where you marked your position at time-of-loss, swim out in line between him and the landmark on the opposite shore -- if a second or third line has been established have those people sing out when your swim line intersects their line-of-site to their opposed shore land-mark; keep swimming till your assistant(s) sing out.
        5. OK, you're over where the model is likely to be -- stick your fat head underwater and listen (a trusted buddy having been instructed to turn the transmitter on and to cycle the motor ahead-astern equal amounts in quick jabs of the stick
        6. if you hear the model move a bit and repeat the listening trick -- as sound travels too fast in water for your tiny brain to read direction, you have to move around until the noise is the loudest
        7. X marks the spot -- drop an anchored buoy marker so you don't cover old territory
        8. take a deep breath and go looking (with your hands in most cases, dumb-ass) as your assistant keeps up with the forward-reverse noise making
        So it is written, so it will be printed, laminated and placed in the "Field Kit" as SOP for "Grey Lady Down"

        I also have another reason to drag friends to the lake, not only to ward of "Spectators" during "Rig for Sea" checks as they do now, but as a "Trained Lookout" when a boat is lost. Stay in your spot and find that far shore landmark!
        NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

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        • #19
          What is the dissolving rod made with?
          If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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          • #20
            Click image for larger version

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ID:	122235 If you turn the lake up to a boil you could shorten the wait.

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            • #21
              Plain old spaghetti?
              That is cool.
              If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

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              • #22
                See you got snagged by some fishing lines.

                I was wondering, would adding some sort of "cable cutter" to the leading edges of your dive plane prevent such occurrences?

                Would sharpening your prop blades (granted they're metal) help?
                Make it simple, make strong, make it work!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by redboat219 View Post
                  See you got snagged by some fishing lines.

                  I was wondering, would adding some sort of "cable cutter" to the leading edges of your dive plane prevent such occurrences?

                  Would sharpening your prop blades (granted they're metal) help?
                  I don't think it would work for the props or the cable cutter.

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                  • #24
                    You'’ll are over thinking this rescue buoy system. I have followed several of Manfred’s (MFR1964 on Nautilus) builds on here and his YouTube videos (Knikebein on YouTube) builds. His "“Resque bouy systems”" YouTube video is about as simple as it gets for adding a buoy system to your build if needed.

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ8iz3kGAtU

                    Ernie

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by SSN687 View Post
                      You'’ll are over thinking this rescue buoy system. I have followed several of Manfred’s (MFR1964 on Nautilus) builds on here and his YouTube videos (Knikebein on YouTube) builds. His "“Resque bouy systems”" YouTube video is about as simple as it gets for adding a buoy system to your build if needed.

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ8iz3kGAtU

                      Ernie
                      In all fairness, I would not call it overthinking. Just a different method.

                      Manred's requires an additional, dedicated servo, and loss of the "fail safe" circuit, and relies on the vessel NOT losing power.

                      Some may not have the addition room, and/or utilize a fail-safe gas blow. I for one would not wish the buoy to pop every time I lose signal. Running in places like Groton would be a train wreck.
                      I don't really think that's overthinking.

                      But what I like MOST is this one simply for the last reason, recovery even with total loss of power. A "backup for a backup"

                      I lost my ENGEL PATRICK HENRY for a week because power dropped and the the ENGEL pumps went into dive mode and stuck.

                      It was at that point I experimented with these using the Tiic-Tac's. Actually used the BRA-8 Buoy hatch to hide the "float"
                      Boy did I get laughed at, but I was trying. THat's what we do.

                      Spaghetti! Now I'm laughing, at myself (Tic-Tacs lol)!! Thank you my Italian ancestors who stole if from the Chinese!!.

                      In the end, what works for some, may not work for others.
                      NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Manfred is brilliant and fun to learn from! I agree there are several ways to do something. Just thinking here, I know scary right?, I seem to recall in my foggy mind about spaghetti being used as a safety trigger, either this site or another. If I had something like that on my Type 23, I might still have it to this day. Sadly relying on positive buoyancy and failsafe blowing of tanks is not enough in my case. I believe my sub was initially hit by someone using the same channel as me (surface runner who does not care for us sub guys - why I do not make an effort to run with that group) made the sub make a hard dive. In a few feet 3-6 feet the foam was compressed enough that it did not have positive buoyancy (I knew it was just a fraction from positive to negative) and the pump to blow the tanks locked up. With idiot using his radio, the sub could have dragged the bottom to who knows where. Diver did not find it and to this day, it is on eternal patrol. So, this thread has me thinking. My Gato has a gas backup, the type 9 does not and my walrus build does not. So, I may need to look at this more. Thank you QuarterMaster and SSN687 for the reminders and this thread!
                        If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by trout View Post
                          Thank you QuarterMaster and SSN687 for the reminders and this thread!
                          Agreed, whole-heartedly.....and this reminded me about this for those who have it.

                          SCR Issue #26 Sep 1996
                          Page 41
                          "Grey Lady Down: A users perspective"
                          by yours truly

                          90% of the procedures that I wrote there was taught to me by those who've come before, especially "He who must not be named."

                          BTW way in that same issue on page 15 is a picture of him in a tie....OHH Myyyyyy (ala George Takei)

                          Sorry...had to (duck)


                          NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

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                          • #28
                            Click image for larger version

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                            This one?
                            Scary.
                            If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by trout View Post
                              Click image for larger version

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                              this one?
                              Scary.
                              score!!!!!!
                              NEVER underestimate the power of a Sailor who served aboard a submarine.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Years ago I put a similar system together for Al Nucifora for his 32nd scale Nautilus. I replaced the original skiff with a cast foam version, then tied a spooled fishing line to it. The skiff was held down by an electromagnet that had it's own 9V power supply. I had the magnet tied to an electronic timer. Back then the timer was huge. Today's version is about the size of a nickel. I'd use the same ones I have for my torpedoes, just with a 2hr timer rather than 5 seconds.

                                This system had a few advantages:

                                1.) Pretty simple to build and implement
                                2.) Not a lot of room needed in the hull
                                3.) Built in backup backup failsafe in that if the battery went dead, the skiff still disengages
                                4.) Finite pop time. Just start your stopwatch when you power up and if she's lost, wait for the timer to run out

                                I built this back before I was really documenting things well for my builds or I'd show some pics. Sorry.


                                Bob

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