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1:300 SeaQuest - New kit from the Nautilus Drydocks

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  • 1:300 SeaQuest - New kit from the Nautilus Drydocks

    As some of you know, I've been working for a while now to bring to market a new, large-scale kit of the SeaQuest from the 90's TV series, "SeaQuest DSV".

    With the help of William Babington, we acquired and laser-scanned the actual wooden maquette used to create the digital files for the TV show. This scan was duplicated, flipped, and assembled into a complete mesh for the sub. Additional details were added via cues from the TV series (huge thanks to Will for dedicating dozens of hours to scour the entire show for us!). The scale is 1:300, putting the boat at approximately 40.24" overall length. This makes a realistic size for display, but also allows adequate room to convert to R/C (a life-long dream of mine!).

    As far as I know, this will be the most accurate version of the boat available.

    With the help of Jim Key of Custom Replicas in California, we are now at the point where we are running castings. These castings will be done in clear blue-tinted resin that should allow internal lighting of the many areas of the boat that call for it (such as all the windows!).

    As it stands now, I hope to have the prototype castings to me by Christmas, an assembled kit in place by the new year, and open up orders by the first week of January.

    I'll post more up here as it comes. Look for a pre-order section of the site to open up in the coming week or two that will offer a discounted price as well as a free copy of our limited-edition 24"x36" poster.

    I'm really excited about this kit (even if no one else is!). I think it should be a great performer for R/C with a gimbaled jet drive in the rear.

    Questions? Comments? Let me know! I'd love to hear from you.


    Bob
    First test-castings of main hull parts Rear drive assembly mockup Detail of intricate hull webbing

  • #2
    That looks Very interesting Bob! I am anxious to see more. I am a sci-fi nut as well as just a general nut
    IT TAKES GREAT INTELLIGENCE TO FAKE SUCH STUPIDITY!

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    • #3
      I'm so happy to see this finally happening

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      • #4

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        • #5
          How in the name of fugg did you get that webbed finish on the castings?

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          • #6
            The webbing was created in CAD by Will, scaled, and then cut out in vinyl sheeting. I then applied it to the masters prior to molding. Very labor intensive, but very worth it!

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            • #7
              Had to have it, Bob and I agreed,its the very essence of the boat, literally, :)

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              • #8

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                • #9

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                  • #10
                    That was a test of the bioskin webbing

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                    • #11
                      So at 40 inches, what size Subdriver will fit? Also what are you planning for the Drive system?

                      IT TAKES GREAT INTELLIGENCE TO FAKE SUCH STUPIDITY!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
                        The webbing was created in CAD by Will, scaled, and then cut out in vinyl sheeting. I then applied it to the masters prior to molding. Very labor intensive, but very worth it!
                        Well Bob, Old Chap, Good Buddy and All Round Nice Guy - how about producing some square webbing at about, oh I don't know, 1/96 scale frame spacing so that some of us less educated morons can reporduce oil canning on our delapidated, old Russian boats?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HardRock View Post

                          Well Bob, Old Chap, Good Buddy and All Round Nice Guy - how about producing some square webbing at about, oh I don't know, 1/96 scale frame spacing so that some of us less educated morons can reporduce oil canning on our delapidated, old Russian boats?
                          Or .....













                          http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dme...how/weathering

                          David
                          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by greenman407 View Post
                            So at 40 inches, what size Subdriver will fit? Also what are you planning for the Drive system?
                            I don't have it all worked out yet without actually having the boat in my hands, however I'm going to assume that there is going to need to be two separate sections, one in the rear for pumps, servos and motors. One in the front for batteries. The central sphere is absolutely perfect for use as a ballast tank (provided you don't go poking holes into it for the EVA doors, that is).

                            It's a unique model and will prove to be challenging to engineer an easy and effective drive solution. I'm absolutely confident that between Dave, myself and the other high-horsepower talent we have on these forums, we'll be able to figure out a great system.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HardRock View Post

                              Well Bob, Old Chap, Good Buddy and All Round Nice Guy - how about producing some square webbing at about, oh I don't know, 1/96 scale frame spacing so that some of us less educated morons can reporduce oil canning on our delapidated, old Russian boats?
                              An interesting idea. I can actually see two options. One would be laser-etched vinyl with anechoic tiles to scale, the other would be the webbing that you're referring to where the modeler could apply it, then wash the surface with filler to create an actual dish finish. It could then be dry-brushed to really bring out the detail. Would be tons of work as all of the scribing would need to be re-done, but it's an interesting idea.

                              I'll run it past Will and see what he thinks.

                              What would the size of the tiles be in common scales? 96th, 72nd, 32nd? I'm going to assume that the actual tile size is different depending on the navy, the time period, or even the specific boat?

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