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Fittings kits - rig for silent running

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Snipah View Post
    Haha typical response, you must be feeling better
    I am, thank you.

    David
    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

    Comment


    • #17
      Hello
      Glad to hear your getting back to your old self.
      Can I ask you, this " other guy" is this a possible serious consideration or just someone blowing smoke?

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by george View Post
        Hello
        Glad to hear your getting back to your old self.
        Can I ask you, this " other guy" is this a possible serious consideration or just someone blowing smoke?
        No, this guy has proven to me to be a responsible adult type; he's pursued this craft with a zeal and measured energy that is so rare these days. And he's expressed a sincere desire to give it a go, in spite of my warning that this very labor-intensive job involves a lot of work with little return. We're already making arrangements to transfer my masters and tooling (fried though the molds may be) over to his place.

        For those not in the know: this is about continued manufacture of the many fittings kits I developed over the years. These kits used to convert plastic model kits over to r/c operation. The following pictures will give you bums some idea of the skills and work required to make all the magic happen:

















        David
        "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

        Comment


        • #19
          3D print the buggers, glue in the metal, your running old tech... Let the printer do the work... :-)
          At least that's what just popped into my mind looking at that.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Snipah View Post
            3D print the buggers, glue in the metal, your running old tech... Let the printer do the work... :-)
            At least that's what just popped into my mind looking at that.
            Silly me. I don't do something unless, at the end of the day, it will give me a positive sense of accomplishment. Any dope can let the 'other guy' do all the heavy lifting.

            If it's worth doing .... IT'S WORTH DOING!!!!

            David
            "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

            Comment


            • #21
              But you just told us all its not worth doing... Just saying!!! Its a great conundrum isn't it.

              What you mention is true in a one off sense of model making in its simplicity. Move onto a business model and its all about time and effort vs return.
              You are still the Master Model Maker.

              :-)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Snipah View Post
                But you just told us all its not worth doing... Just saying!!! Its a great conundrum isn't it.

                What you mention is true in a one off sense of model making in its simplicity. Move onto a business model and its all about time and effort vs return.
                You are still the Master Model Maker.

                :-)
                I should have qualified that. I'll try here: If you're not making enough money from the effort, it's not worth doing.

                Money is how I keep score. The more money, the more appreciated my work is declared. But, the robots are pushing my ilk aside. Progress. Embrace it or get run over by it.

                I'm the last buggy-whip maker at the dawn of the automotive age. I know that. 'I've lived too long', my Dad occasionally mumbled. Now I know what he meant.

                Yes, the machines can do it better, quicker, and cheaper than I can employing brain and hands.

                But ... where will we be when the electricity stops? As a species we're painting ourselves into a corner. Soon no one will know how to use their brain and hands. The die-off will be of biblical proportions.

                David
                "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                Comment


                • #23
                  O yeah...he is back.


                  As I'm keep digging out information about those lovely Russian subs.....I keep working old school......don't want to be subject to a Russian EMP attack to shut me down like they did with the USS Theodore Roosevelt.

                  Speaking for myself I can’t imagine that the satisfaction of scratch building can be compared to 3D printing stuff. But the day those high precision printers are getting affordable I will get one, so I will be able 3D print all those small items I simply can’t manage crafting by hand right now.

                  To make submarine kits commercially is hardly impossible IMO.…..I’m developing the Victor III……the time I already spent just to make sure everything is scale wise regarding the dimensions runs into a couple of 100 hours……studying pictures, making adjustments……and I haven’t touched the modeling board yet…..ok I’m a detail nut fair enough…..but nevertheless I can’t imagine that someone can make a living by selling hulls if you consider every hour you spent on it……..or you have to be satisfied with making 10$ an hour or less.

                  Most of us do it because we love the hobby and the community of submarine nuts, to help each other out, to steel brilliant ideas, for me it does not matter if it’s done by 3D printing, CNC router, or whatever you like, as long as you share it.

                  Grtz,
                  Bart
                  Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
                  "Samuel Smiles"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I'm with you for the most part, Bart. You summed things up nicely. And your observation about the poor return for effort expended -- in the selling side of things, anyway. It's mostly a hobby subsidized enough to cover costs and little more.

                    And spot on about the research side of the effort -- what's the point of building a fine looking model if it is not as true to prototype as is humanly possible?

                    David
                    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I really wish I could make a living at subs, but alas, I shall have to wait until retirement. Only 8,640 more days to go.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by He Who Shall Not Be Named View Post
                        what's the point of building a fine looking model if it is not as true to prototype as is humanly possible?
                        David
                        Indeed

                        Originally posted by SubHuman View Post
                        I really wish I could make a living at subs, but alas, I shall have to wait until retirement. Only 8,640 more days to go.
                        Please don't tell me you have a countdown calender hanging in your garage.

                        Grtz,
                        Bart
                        Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
                        "Samuel Smiles"

                        Comment

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