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dry-transfers

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  • dry-transfers


    Here’s a quick look at how to apply dry-transfers: http://woodlandscenics.woodlandsceni.../MG757inst.pdf

    Woodland Scenics is an excellent source of dry-transfers in just about any font imaginable, and these markings can be hand in several colors. Check out their catalog.

    When placed on the work, the face of the dry-transfer marking is in direct contact with the models surface with the backing film on top. You apply a force (burnishing) over the backing film, pushing the dry-transfer marking into the work where the adhesive bond between the marking and work becomes greater than the adhesive bond between marking and the carrier film. So, when the carrier film is pulled away from the work, the marking remains on the models surface. And that’s the mechanism of transport.

    Dry transfers differ from water-slide decals in that the dry-transfer characters (markings) are not interconnected by a clear backing film. Each dry-transfer letter/number/character is a self-adhesive, discrete element that is embossed onto the subjects surface by applying pressure over the carrier film, the base upon which the dry-transfer marking(s) was deposited during manufacture. The dry-transfer marking itself is a wax-like, mild adhesive.

    The liability of a water slide (decal) is the transparent film linking the characters together – unless the model surface is prepared correctly (a gloss finish) and a semi-solvent applied (to more closely bond the decal to the models surface. If these measures are not taken there is the likelihood of an unsightly ‘silvering’ (minute air-bubbles) being observed under the clear decal film. A dry-transfer marking has no surrounding connecting clear film, therefore it presents no silvering to spoil the finish.

    A shortcoming of dry-transfers is the need to register and apply each marking independently – an exacting and time consuming chore. Also, until a clear coat is laid down, it is too easy to scratch or pull the dry-transfer marking off the model if care around them is not exercised. However, that weak adhesive bond of the dry-transfer marking to the models surface is also an asset:

    Dry-transfers also serve as effective, exacting, painting masks. Say you have dry transfers of the right font, but can’t find them in the color you need. Simply paint the area of the model in the signage colors required. Then, lay down the dry transfers. Paint over the dry-transfer masks the basic model color. And place masking tape over the dry-transfers and lift. Off come the dry-transfer masks revealing perfect signage in the color needed.


    Dry transfers differ from water-slide decals in that the dry-transfer characters (markings) are not interconnected by a clear backing film. Each dry-transfer letter/number/character is a self-adhesive, discrete element that is embossed onto the subjects surface through pressure applied over the backing film, the base upon which the dry-transfer marking(s) was deposited during manufacture - the dry-transfer character itself is a mild adhesive.

    The liability of a water slide (decal) is the transparent film linking the characters together – unless the model surface is prepared correctly (a gloss finish) and a semi-solvent applied (to more closely bond the decal to the models surface) there is the likelihood of an unsightly ‘silvering’ (minute air-bubbles) being observed under the clear decal film. As a dry-transfer has no connecting clear film, there is no silvering to spoil the finish.

    When placed on the work, the face of the marking is in direct contact with the models surface with the backing film on top. You apply a force (burnishing) over the backing film, pushing the dry-transfer marking into the work where the adhesive bond between the marking and work becomes greater than the adhesive bond between marking and the carrier film. So, when the carrier film is pulled away from the work, the marking remains on the models surface. And that’s the mechanism of transport.

    A shortcoming of dry-transfers is the need to register and apply each marking independently – an exacting and time consuming chore. Also, until a clear coat is laid down, it is too easy to scratch or pull the dry-transfer marking off the model if care around them is not exercised.

    Woodland Scenics is an excellent source of dry-transfers in just about any font imaginable, and in an array of colors. Check out their catalog.

    Here are some practical examples of how dry transfers are used:


    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image002.jpg[/IMG]

    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0004.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0004.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    An extension of dry-transfer usage is in the manufacture of ‘metallic’ name-plates. The sort of identifier attached to machinery and consoles to denote type, mod, alterations, serial and part numbers, and other such nomenclature used to identify the equipment.

    Here I’m transferring some custom made dry-transfers to strips of self-adhesive aluminum foil. The metallic backing seen through the stamp-spaces provided on the signage is most distinctive.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image004.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0010.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0010.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    And here you see the dry-transfer-self adhesive metal foil identification plaques attached to the top of this model representing a data recording machine. This shows how creative use of two techniques mediums, dry-transfers and self-adhesive metallic foil, can produce a very credible representation of identifying signage. Looks just like the real thing.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image006.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0005_1.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0005_1.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image008.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0008_1.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0008_1.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    And here the black and white custom made dry-transfers used to mark out three components of the DRS ‘mission tape recording system’ and main console. These models, built for DRS about two decades ago, were employed as sales tools at the corporate headquarters.

    Such clear and well defined signage seen on these models would have been difficult to achieve by hand – custom made dry-transfers were the right call for this job. Today, outfits like Woodland Scenics produces such a wide array of markings, in many different colors, that if I were to tackle this job now I likely would find all these markings in their massive catalog.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image010.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0006_1.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0006_1.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Everything from the ‘AMPEX’ on the face of the reel-to-reel to the instruction placard on the inside of the access door was achieved with dry-transfers custom made for the job from art-work I submitted.

    Custom made dry-transfers are produced from your submitted art-work: work out the font and character form and submit the art-work at least two-times the size required (with a note to the dry-transfer producer of the reduction factor), gang everything of the same color on a discrete sheet/file.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image012.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/PICT0007.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/PICT0007.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    A closer look at the tape-recorder model. A non-functioning model, I must point out. An interesting note: I was informed by the client that some idiot at Corporate broke off a few knobs from this model in an attempt to make it function. Moron’s in three-piece suits, apparently.

    (If only they knew … The magnetic tape for this model was liberated from an old cassette – the width of that tape perfect for the scale of this reel-to-reel model display. If some idiot ever un-spools that tape and plays it, they’ll be treated to the melodic tones of, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida!).



    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image014.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCF2354.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCF2354.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Using the Woodland Scenics white dry-transfers for most of my model submarines that require the white Roman Gothic font has been the way to go for decades! These are accurate, well spaced numbers and letters – everything a model needs for hull numbers, draft numbers and ships name.

    A set of equal-spacing-divers, masking tape and other tools and consumables are used to lay-out the position and spacing of the dry-transfers before they are applied over and adhered to the models surface.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image016.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCN0064.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCN0064.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Note the use of a horizontally oriented strip of masking tape on this models sail. The edge of the tape insures that the applied dry-transfer markings all fall along the same plane. In this example the burnishing tool is a blunted soft-lead pencil point.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image018.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCF2343.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCF2343.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Equally spaced marks were laid down on a strip of masking tape with the aid of the equal-spacing-divider tool. In this case draft numbers that go on the upper rudder of a submarine model. The tape guide not only insures correct spacing between the dry-transfer markings, it also guides me as to the vertical line they all have to fall along. The burnishing tool: a ball-point pen.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image020.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCF2336.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCF2336.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    One problem with self-adhesive dry-transfers is that with some brands the adhesive quality of the markings weakens with age. I’ve found that you can reactivate the markings through the application of heat. The markings don’t have to be hot when applied, just warm them up a few minutes before application and you’ll likely recovery enough of the markings ‘stickiness’ to get the job done.

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image022.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCF2334.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCF2334.jpg[/IMG][/URL]


    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image024.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCF2327.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCF2327.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    The ideal burnishing tool is a ball-point pen – the ball producing a low drag friction yet imparts a powerful compression force when rolled over the top of the plastic backing film. The more compressive force applied to the dry-transfer, the better it sticks to the work. Duh!
    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image026.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/DSCN0127%202.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/DSCN0127%202.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/David/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image028.jpg[/IMG]
    [URL=http://s262.photobucket.com/user/dmeriman/media/markings/015.jpg.html][IMG]http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii116/dmeriman/markings/015.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Another version of dry-transfer is the self-adhesive backed aluminum foil produced by Bare-Metal-Foil. Unlike dry-transfers the foil is cut out while on its backing sheet, then the cut-out foil carefully lifted off the backing sheet and applied to the models surface. Great for items that must have that shiny ‘metallic’ look. This medium (self adhesive aluminum foil) is also an excellent means of achieving precision masks for delicate paint-work.

    "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

  • #2
    Learning curve is rising, all new to me Thks.

    When I see all those wonderful things you made David.....do you never wonder were those objects finally end up?

    grtz,
    Bart

    Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
    "Samuel Smiles"

    Comment


    • #3
      I try not to. Most wind up in a land-fill.

      M
      "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

      Comment


      • #4
        Tarring and feathering is what comes into my mind.

        Lets assume that they are not aware of what it takes to make those objects as close to perfection as possible.......someone paid for it but still it does not feel OK.

        Grtz,
        Bart
        Last edited by bwi 971; 05-28-2016, 12:04 PM.
        Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
        "Samuel Smiles"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by bwi 971 View Post
          Tarring and feathering is what comes into my mind.

          Lets assume that they are not aware of what it takes to make those objects as close to perfection as possible.......someone paid for it but still it does not feel OK.

          Grtz,
          Bart
          ​Used to tear my heart out when I heard of a product being discarded. But, after getting old and seeing the cliff-edge a few times, it's sunk in that people and the objects they make are here but for a few moments, then wink out of existence. Enjoy the ride for what it is, then slide your fanny off the seat to make room for the next guy ....

          Circle of life and all that happy horse-****.

          M
          "... well, that takes care of Jorgenson's theory!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Photobucket rules I suppose.....darn I was looking for "Equal Spacing Divider"

            Practical wisdom is only to be learned in the school of experience.
            "Samuel Smiles"

            Comment

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